Do You Know How to Keep Your Audience Interested?

Scene from Rocky film - films and speeches must change scenes to keep your audience interested.

Like a great film, a presentation must vary scenes, pace, and energy to keep an audience interested.

Do you vary your scenes? The biggest enemy of a speaker, no matter how exceptional, is sameness or lack of variety. Each time you move from story to story or example to example, you create a scene change and keep your audience interested.

Early in every movie, the hero or heroine commits to some course of action. Rocky Balboa agrees to fight Apollo Creed. Elle Woods of Legally Blonde resolves to go to Harvard. The sooner this happens, the sooner the audience gets emotionally involved. (more…)

Storytelling & Your Presentation: Why & How to Find A Hero

Find a hero for the story you tell in your speech or presentation. Sometimes heroes are unlikely, as the character of a reluctant King George VI, as portrayed by Colin Firth in The King's Speech.

Find a hero for the story you tell in your speech or presentation. Sometimes heroes are unlikely, as the character of reluctant King George VI, portrayed by Colin Firth in The King’s Speech.

Do you captivate your audience with captivating characters in your presentations?

The late comedy impresario John Cantu knew that speakers must not be the heroes of all their stories. Once, we sat down together to deconstruct one of his speeches and found 62 different people mentioned! Learn from great books, plays, and films. Fill your speech with exciting characters, real and imaginary.
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When You’re on The Spot, Speech Structure Can Save You

Patricia Fripp explains speech structure through Fripp Virtual Training.

Patricia Fripp explains speech structure through Fripp Virtual Training.

You might already know that a successful speech starts with structure, but did you know that speech structure can save you if you find yourself on the spot without time to prepare?

Imagine this scenario… you are a consultant attending a client conference, when an executive notices you in the audience.  She says, “Hi! I didn’t know you were going to be here. We’re 10 minutes ahead of schedule. Would you mind coming up an giving us a quick report on the XYZ project?” (more…)

Executive Communications: Big Impressions on Small Audiences

Executive Communications two executives speaking

Outside your home, ALL speaking is public speaking.

I was chatting with a team member of a consulting firm who said that because his organization focused on innovation, it was absolutely necessary to clearly articulate his ideas. His problem: he often found himself struggling when approached in the hall by the head of another department or a senior executive. For him, it is much easier to speak in front of a large group than to master the “water cooler” vignette. He felt that larger venues allowed time for preparation and added that, “The impromptu meetings really catch you off guard.” (more…)