What Is The Biggest Mistake Sales Professionals Make?

Patricia Fripp Shares the Biggest Mistake Sales Professionals Make

Patricia Fripp shares the biggest mistake sales professionals make and what to do to make your sales presentations powerful and persuasive.

“Patricia, what is the biggest mistake sales professionals make?” I was recently asked this in an interview. My answer?

Not rehearsing.

I expected to hear, “We lock the presentation team in the board room for a week. We go over our parts, video, and review. Then we bring in at least five different audiences of team members to listen and give their feedback.”

This is what he actually said, “We are lucky if we do a run-though in the back of Sylvia’s car before we walk in.”


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Do You Know How to Keep Your Audience Interested?

Scene from Rocky film - films and speeches must change scenes to keep your audience interested.

Like a great film, a presentation must vary scenes, pace, and energy to keep an audience interested.

Do you vary your scenes? The biggest enemy of a speaker, no matter how exceptional, is sameness or lack of variety. Each time you move from story to story or example to example, you create a scene change and keep your audience interested.

Early in every movie, the hero or heroine commits to some course of action. Rocky Balboa agrees to fight Apollo Creed. Elle Woods of Legally Blonde resolves to go to Harvard. The sooner this happens, the sooner the audience gets emotionally involved. (more…)

How Can You Grab Your Audience? Expert Advice

Vivien Leigh grabs the audience from her first moment onscreen in Gone with The Wind. Wikimedia Commons image.

If you don’t grab your audience in the first 30 seconds and hint at more to come, you lose them. This is true in film and in public speaking.

Do you know how to grab your audience? The first thirty seconds of your presentation are critical, like the first page of a book or first seconds of a TV show or film. If you don’t make an impact and hint at more to come, you lose your audience.

Good movies, TV shows, and books, like good speeches, often open with a flavor scene, grabbing attention and positioning the audience for what is to come. Take a classic movie that has been a favorite for eight decades, Gone with the Wind. Neither the book nor the film opens with a discussion of the causes of the Civil War. Both start with Scarlett O’Hara sulking because the impending war might interrupt her social life. (more…)

How to Stay Clear, Concise & Focused on Your Prospect’s Needs

prospect's needs must be central to your sales presentations from FrippVT

Patricia Fripp explains how to make your prospect’s needs central to your sales presentation through FrippVT.

Selling to large enterprises can be complex, but your sales presentation does not have to be. You are often speaking to the audience of your audience. In other words, your presentation will be repeated and discussed for months with individuals you may not have met.

When your message is clear, concise, and focused on the prospect’s needs or opportunities, you have their attention. Everyone on the presentation team must deliver a consistent message and be well rehearsed. (more…)