Whether you’re delivering a sales presentation, a keynote speech, or a report to the board, choose your words carefully to build credibility, sound intelligent, and make your message understood. When you choose and use precise language you will sound intelligent. You will have the power to make your message stick and be quoted from the boardroom to the convention hall.


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In the classic movie Gone with The Wind, Vivien Leigh captures the audience from her first moment on screen.

Grab your audience in the first 30 seconds. If you don’t, you will lose them. This is true both in movies and in public speaking.

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How do you handle a sales presentation when a new relationship is potentially worth millions?

Use these four principles to help you and your sales team create a new client relationship.
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Do you immediately engage your audience? Powerful openings are key to successful presentations. Learn how to craft and deliver your openings so you always engage your audience within the first 30 seconds of your talk.

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Speaking as a panelist? Think you can just “wing it?” Think again.

Almost everyone is aware that a formal presentation requires preparation and rehearsal, but it’s easy to forget that “doing your homework” can ensure your success in any speaking situation, including a panel discussion. As a panelist – if you want the audience to understand and appreciate your ideas and information – organize your thoughts and understand your strategy well in advance of joining your fellow panelists on stage. (more…)

Is your audience hearing what you want to communicate? It is not just what you say, it is how you say it.

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Does your PowerPoint support your message or distract your audience? Understanding when and how to use PowerPoint for maximum impact, you can make it powerful.

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More than any words you say in your presentation, your audience will remember what they “see” in their minds while they are listening. Learn the secrets of great storytelling. Everybody loves a good story.

The art of storytelling is essential to effective public speaking. No matter what our culture, we grow up feeling that hearing a story is somehow a reward. Stories are the best way to explain the complex, motivate, and train.

Pixar’s 22 Rules of Storytelling

By Emma Coats

These rules were originally tweeted by Emma Coats, Pixar’s story artist. Number nine on the list—when you’re stuck, make a list of what wouldn’t happen next—is a great one and can apply to writers in all genres.

1. You admire a character for trying more than for their successes.

2. Keep in mind what’s interesting to you as an audience, not what’s fun to do as a writer. They can be very different. (more…)