Public Speaking Is The Number One Tool of Leadership

Sims Wyeth

Sims Wyeth

It is mind-boggling how many highly-intelligent, well-educated, and ambitious executives spend years finding creative ways to get OUT of public speaking of any kind. Some even panic when these opportunities arise. My friend and colleague, Sims Wyeth very wisely reminds us not to waste these opportunities.

Public Speaking Is The Glue
by Sims Wyeth

Public speaking is the number one tool of leadership, because when you get people in a room to hear the same message at the same time you have the greatest chance of moving them to action.

Don’t waste your opportunities.  The glue that holds people together is a magical mystery sauce of trust, emotion, and shared purpose.  In business, meetings and presentations are key opportunities for creating and sustaining that magic. (more…)

Everyone is Interesting… Some More Than Others!

Patricia Fripp's Virtual Training.

Patricia Fripp’s Virtual Training

I am on my way to speak for the National Speakers Association in Chicago on Friday, April 26th.

The chapter has someone picking me up at the airport. Naturally I Googled who it was.

WOW!!! As my favorite activity is having interesting conversations with interesting people you can image how excited  I am to find out who my driver is… (more…)

What’s wrong with work ethic in America?

What’s wrong with work ethic in America?

This is a question that my good friend in-demand keynote speaker Eric Chester is answering for his corporate and assocation clients. They asked him so often he realized this HAD to be his new book. He has given me permission to post a segment to give my readers a taste. Hope you enjoy.

Reviving Work Ethic by Eric Chester

Reviving Work Ethic by Eric Chester

The decline of work ethic is not uniquely an American problem, but one that is affecting all Western nations and a growing number of those in the East.  However, if we examine the American workplace today with a comparable example from the 1930s, 1960’s, or even the 1990’s, it’s easy to see that America has lost sight of the virtues that comprise work ethic—the very things that helped build our country.
 The pursuit of happiness and the American Dream drove progress and innovation, but they came with unintended side effects. In many cases, for instance, healthy ambition has morphed into avarice. Urbanization and an emphasis on large-scale businesses means fewer and fewer kids are learning about work in the natural course of family life.
 Technological advances that make life faster, more fun, more entertaining, and easier to navigate are also consuming our time and energy while eliminating avenues for learning vital concepts about work. And pop psychologists have pushed parents to focus on building self-esteem in their children, creating at least two generations of me-centric workers. No wonder so many employers are use terms like entitled, disengaged, unmotivated, and disloyal when describing their current workforce and potential labor pool.
 
Are leaders really struggling with work ethic-deficient employees?
 Pull any employer to the side and ask them to describe, in general, the work ethic that they see represented throughout their ranks and your apt to hear some colorful language. Even the eternally optimistic warm and fuzzy managers wince a bit when the term work ethic enters the dialogue. I interact with thousands of leaders, managers, business owners and execs each year and I’ve yet to find any who believe that the work ethic represented in the current labor pool stands up to that of the labor pool twenty, ten—or even five years ago. These same employers, however, will openly lament the prevailing entitlement mentality of the emerging workforce that many decry is contagious, now rampant among X’ers and even baby boomers.
 
 Which generation of workers is having the most trouble with their work habits and why?

America’s emerging workforce—those in the ­sixteen-to-twenty-four age bracket—bring some amazing skill sets and personality traits into the labor pool. The challenge is that Millennials don’t always want to work, and when they do, their terms don’t always line up with those of their employers. All too often, the young worker shows up ten minutes late wearing flip-flops, pajama bottoms, and a T-shirt that says “My inner child is a nasty bastard.” Then she fidgets through her shift until things slow down enough that she can text her friends or update her Facebook page from her smartphone.

Speaker & Author Eric Chester

Speaker & Author Eric Chester

 All too often, these bright and ambitious recruits see work as something to avoid or as a necessary evil to endure prior to winning the lottery, landing a spot on a reality television show, or getting a cushy, high-paying job with a corner office and an expense account.
Before you write this off as unfair stereotyping, consider what millennial workers had to say about themselves and their peers.

In February 2010, the Pew Research Center released an extensive report titled “Millennials: A Portrait of Generation Next” that proves this generation doesn’t identify with work ethic. The Pew research found that 61 percent of Millennials say their generation has a “unique and distinctive identity.” That’s about the same percentage you’ll find for other generations, but what’s different are the things Gen Y sees as its distinctive qualities. (more…)