Speech coach and author Gary Genard is a great blogger. In a recent post, Gary discusses Sir Richard Branson’s advice on public speaking. Branson, the entrepreneur, adventurer, humanitarian, and founder of the Virgin Group, explained his approach to presentations in an article called, “My Top Tips for Public Speaking,” on the Virgin website. Branson declared, […]

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With current technology, you might not be surprised at how often I’m asked, “How do you use video in your business?” As often and in as many ways as possible! We have a green screen, professional lighting, and great recording equipment, and my assistant has become highly proficient at adding backgrounds, images, and branding. This […]

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An outside perspective on your presentation or public speaking skills is often the best way to discover where you can improve your content or delivery. However, ask yourself: “Is this person giving their advice truly qualified to help me? Does this person have my best interests at heart? Am I asking for their input, or […]

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When you receive feedback and advice on how to improve your presentation skills you need to ask yourself: Is the person giving this advice truly qualified to help me improve? Does the person giving me feedback have my best interests at heart? Am I seeking advice or are they motivated to give it to me? […]

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My great speech coach Ron Arden who had enjoyed a successful acting and directly career always told his students “Public speakers need variety in their presentation just as we do in the theatre. The enemy of the speaker is sameness.” My World Champions Edge buddy Ed Tate sent this review to me from a TV […]

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A frequently asked question on public speaking is “How Do I Organize My Speech?”

Here is a basic outline that work well for the beginning speaker.

1. THE PAST-PRESENT-JOURNEY FORMAT: This simple outline can help you tell the audience who you are and why you are qualified to speak on the topic you’ve chosen.

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Gervais Humor at Golden Globes
When a comedian hosts an awards show, you can expect some roast-style humor. That’s why they hire the comic. A roast structure creates a vehicle to ensure the success of the jokes which follow. Before you start firing jokes at people in the audience, you need permission. This is usually received by making fun of yourself, which gives you permission to make fun of the boss or authority figures, which gives you permission to make fun of the honored guests.

Last night Ricky Gervais hosted the Golden Globe Awards for the third year. Some people were surprised he was chosen as this year’s emcee because many thought he was over-the-top offensive last year. But in his pre-show appearances, he made it clear that he was going to do some sharply-pointed humor this year, too. The anticipation of what he was going to say helped build the tension, which is an important trigger for humor.

Here are some bits from his monologue (not the whole monologue) and some observations:

So where was I?
(A transition from last year’s performance to this year’s. Sets the stage for “more of the same.”)

Nervous? Don’t be. This isn’t about you.
(He will start primarily with jokes about the sponsor of the event and himself.)

Hello, I’m Ricky Gervais and welcome to the 69th annual Golden Globe Awards live from the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles. Voted for by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association.
(His formal opening lines establish the fact that the Hollywood Foreign Press Association was an authority figure, a fact which may not have been well-known to the television viewing audience.)

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