Patricia Fripp explains speech structure through Fripp Virtual Training.

Patricia Fripp explains speech structure through Fripp Virtual Training.

 

You might already know that a successful speech starts with structure, but did you know that speech structure can save you if you find yourself on the spot without time to prepare? This post will help you, and please join my free webinar (Patricia Fripp) for more advice.

How to Organize a Presentation Easily, Quickly and Effectively

Tuesday, April 11, 2017 at 12 Noon Pacific
Register; even if you can’t attend, you receive the replay link

Imagine this scenario: You are a consultant attending a client conference when an executive notices you in the audience.  She says, “Hi! I didn’t know you were going to be here. We’re 10 minutes ahead of schedule. Would you mind coming up and giving us a quick report on the XYZ project?”

As you make your way to the front, you have only 12 rows to gather your thoughts before you take the stage to deliver 10 minutes’ worth of powerful, persuasive content. This is an important client. You want to do well. Take a deep breath. Remember, just like a formal presentation, an impromptu talk has a premise, central theme, or big idea. Your talking points prove your premise. Order your thoughts using this formula as your guide.

I ask my clients, “If you had one sentence rather than ten, twenty, or thirty minutes, what would you say?” That is your big idea. If you spend one to three minutes explaining your premise, you have told me the entire outline of your speech.

For example, as an executive speech coach, my premise might be summed up in this way: “Every professional can deliver a great presentation.” If you asked me, “Patricia, what are you going to talk about,” I’d reply, “I will tell the audience that no matter how inexperienced they are, they can deliver a great presentation.”

You would most likely ask me, “Great, how do I do that?” Exactly what the audience will be thinking.

Once you know your central theme, your next logical step is to answer your audience’s unspoken question.  When you have your talking points, which naturally follow your premise in basic speech structure, you add a great opening, some examples, and focus on why the audience would care.  Even with an impromptu talk, it is possible to be powerful and persuasive when you give compelling evidence to support your premise, make an emotional connection with your audience, and share memorable stories or examples.

If you understand and follow the formula for speech structure, you can handle anything — even at a moment’s notice.

Make a habit of keeping a few opening lines in your back pocket that will work for you in any circumstance. Jerry Lewis said that his best ad-libs took eight hours to write. What makes it an ad-lib is the fact that you never quite know when you’re going to use it, so it’s a good idea to have a few of those in your back pocket as well.

Although our presentations and business communications might be tailored to different situations and audiences, the principles remain the same.

How to Organize a Presentation Easily, Quickly and Effectively

Tuesday, April 11, 2017 at 12 Noon Pacific
Register; even if you can’t attend, you receive the replay link

You will learn how to do the following:

Understand the number one secret of getting buy-in for your ideas; simplify the process of organizing a presentation; mine the treasure trove of your content, and utilize the famous Fripp Speech Model.

Enjoy this sample of content from Patricia Fripp’s online learning training. Take a look at three of our content-rich chapters.

 

Executive Speech Coach and Hall of Fame Keynote Speaker Patricia Fripp is hired by those who realize that powerful, persuasive presentation skills give them a competitive edge.

 

Executive Speech Coach Patricia Fripp explains how to close your presentation to leave a lasting impact through FrippVT.

Executive Speech Coach Patricia Fripp explains how to close your presentation to leave a lasting impact through FrippVT.

Last words linger. Star presenters know this well and use it to their advantage. Give your closing words extra consideration. Don’t close your presentation with, “We’re out of time,” even if you are. You waste your final opportunity to reinforce your core message. Don’t close on a Q & A, just in case you’re asked an awkward question, or in case an audience member just shares a rambling opinion. These are distractions that diminish your impact on your audience. You can thank your audience for the opportunity to speak, but don’t make these your last words. Instead, close your speech with words that support your presentation and maximize your impact. I share some examples of how to correctly close your presentation in this video:

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Executive Speech Coach Patricia Fripp, “Always open your presentation with impact.”

Without exception, every executive speech coaching client I work with needs my help with the opening of their presentation. Even if no other part of your presentation is scripted, you must always script the first three or four lines. Not that you’re going to read them! Instead, you will rehearse them so that they are so internalized that your spouse could elbow you in the middle of the night and you could deliver your opening. If you would like to improve the way you open your presentations, why not watch How to Open Your Presentations with Impact. No matter who your audience is, or how long you have to speak, you need to get off to a good start.


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Patricia Fripp explains how to open your presentation with impact through FrippVT screenshot.

Patricia Fripp shows you how to open your presentation with impact through FrippVT.

If you want to improve your presentations learn your options for openings. No matter what your subject, audience make up, or length of presentation what good presentations have in common is they get off to a good start.

The first 30 seconds of your presentation are very important, as your goal is to engage the audience. When you see they are smiling and paying attention it builds your confidence. There are many ways to open a speech or presentation. Some of the techniques are a question, story, statistic, quotation, little known fact, or a challenge.

 

How to Open Your Speech from FrippVT

Patricia Fripp helps speakers become great speakers easily, conveniently, quickly and cost effectively with FrippVT.com web based presentation skills training.Fripp Virtual Training

 

Rock Star Communication by Patricia FrippTrue rock stars always end a concert on a high. Next, their fans spill from the crowded arena, still rocking out to an awesome replay in their heads. We can learn a lot about inspiring action and commitment from the world of rock music. When it comes to your presentation, always close on a high. Your last words are your opportunity to reinforce your core message before you leave the stage. In this fourth installment of my Rock Star Communication series, I explain how to end your presentation with a Kick A$$ Closing. Continue reading

Rock Star Communication by Patricia FrippEven highly intelligent, well-educated, and ambitious executives can find themselves at a loss when called on to deliver a powerful presentation. The good news is, even if you’re not a born speaker, you can learn how to inspire action and commitment. I share the ROCK Star Principles one shy engineer used – and you can also use too – to become a ROCK Star communicator in the business world.

Enjoy this replay of my recent web event, How to Steal the Show Every Time You Speak:

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FrippVT Screenshot Great Speaker Leadership Presentation

Is that great speaker really you? It can be. Patricia Fripp shows executives how to deliver powerful leadership presentations through FrippVT.

If you have one of your past presentations recorded, watch it. Take notes on what you do well and what you believe you could do better.

When you’re watching your recorded presentation, it’s a good idea to pretend you’re watching somebody else. This allows you to be more objective.  What did this speaker do right? What could be improved?

As a speech coach, one element I look for when I watch a recorded executive speech or a live presentation is the moment the speaker warms up or becomes relaxed. Speaking in public, especially to 1,500 people, is not a natural act. We need to learn the techniques that make it appear natural.

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Rock Star Communications by Patricia Fripp how to steal the show theshow with your presentation

Executive Speech Coach and creator of FrippVT, Patricia Fripp shows you how to be a rock star communicator and steal the show with your presentation every time.

If you think you can use the first 45 seconds with an audience to “warm up,” think again! Use your opening to immediately engage your audience, so they realize from your first words, “Wow! This is going to be good!”

In an era of tough competition, presentations that persuade, educate, motivate, and inspire give you a competitive edge. Good presentation skills are no longer simply nice to have; they can mean career life or death.

Enjoy this replay of my recent web event, How to Steal the Show Every Time You Speak:

 

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